O'Malley And Ehrlich Differ On Purple Line | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

O'Malley And Ehrlich Differ On Purple Line

Play associated audio
Maryland governor Martin O'Malley speaks with riders at the New Carrollton metro station, which is one of the end points for the proposed Purple Line.
Matthew Bush
Maryland governor Martin O'Malley speaks with riders at the New Carrollton metro station, which is one of the end points for the proposed Purple Line.

By Matt Bush

In Maryland, the Montgomery County council is expected next week to approve a station alignment plan for the proposed Purple Line, to Prince George's County. But some argue the plan may end up being meaningless.

Nearly a year ago, governor Martin O'Malley and several other state politicians announced Maryland would seek federal funding to build the Purple Line as a light rail system. With O'Malley seeking re-election this year, he's sticking by that plan.

But his likely opponent, former Republican governor Bob Ehrlich, says federal money for light rail does not exist. Ehrlich wants to instead build a rapid bus line as a substitute if he's elected, saying it costs about a third of what the current Purple Line plan does. O'Malley says busses won't save that much money.

"If you look at the operations long-term, there really aren't cost advantages of going with the bus, rather than the light rail. There's some additional capital costs up front, but the longer term operating costs on the back end is what makes bus rapid transit not the preferred option for this particular route," says O'Malley.

Right now the federal government is evaluating the light rail plan.

NPR

MacArthur Fellow Terrance Hayes: Poems Are Music, Language Our Instrument

Hayes, a professor of writing at the University of Pittsburgh, was recognized for "reflecting on race, gender, and family in works that seamlessly encompass both the historical and the personal."
NPR

Diet Soda May Alter Our Gut Microbes And The Risk Of Diabetes

There's a new wrinkle to the old debate over diet soda: Artificial sweeteners may alter our microbiomes. And for some, this may raise blood sugar levels and set the stage for diabetes.
NPR

House Passes Bill That Authorizes Arming Syrian Rebels

Even though it was backed by both party leaders, the vote split politicians within their own ranks. The final tally on the narrow military measure was 273 to 156.
NPR

3.7 Million Comments Later, Here's Where Net Neutrality Stands

A proposal about how to maintain unfettered access to Internet content drew a bigger public response than any single issue in the Federal Communication Commission's history. What's next?

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.