National Minority Mental Health Month Raises Awareness In D.C. | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Filed Under:

National Minority Mental Health Month Raises Awareness In D.C.

Play associated audio

By Elliott Francis

July is National Minority Mental Health month. Last evening a community forum was held in the District to increase awareness of problems specific to people of color struggling with mental health issues.

At-Large D.C. City Councilmember Michael Brown hosted the event, which drew two dozen mental health advocates. Brown says although mental health issues don't discriminate when it comes to race, or income, the level of care for disinvested individuals is typically less than adequate.

"What can happen is that people of color can get left aside and not included in the larger plan on how to fix particular issues and find solutions," says

Dr Barbara Barzon is with the districts department of mental health. She says one of the setbacks in communities of color is the stigma associated with mental illness.

"A lot of that has to do with saving face, and some of the cultural ways about what you tell and what you don't tell," she says.

A study by the American Psychiatric Association reveals two thirds of all DC residents suffering from mental illness have not sought treatment for their condition.

NPR

For Paul Cezanne, An Apple A Day Kept Obscurity Away

In the 1800s, still-life painting was the bottom feeder of the art world, but that's where the French painter chose to leave his mark. "I want to astonish Paris with an apple," he's said to have said.
NPR

From McDonald's To Organic Valley, You're Probably Eating Wood Pulp

Many processed foods contain cellulose, which is plant fiber that is commonly extracted from wood. It's used to add texture, prevent caking and boost fiber. And it's been around for ages.
WAMU 88.5

Virginia Democrats And Republicans Fight Over Investigating Senator's Resignation

Democrats and Republicans in Virginia are at odds over the value of investigating the state Senator Phil Puckett, who resigned last month to take a job at a state tobacco commission — and turned the Senate over to Republicans.
NPR

Hackers In China Reportedly Targeted U.S. Federal Workers

According to a report in The New York Times, hackers accessed U.S. government databases in March and apparently targeted files on employees who have applied for top-secret security clearances.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.