Landscapers Come To D.C. Area To Serve Arlington Cemetery; Lobby For Immigration | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Landscapers Come To D.C. Area To Serve Arlington Cemetery; Lobby For Immigration

Play associated audio

By Jonathan Wilson

This week, landscaping professionals from across the country are doing their part to help Arlington National Cemetery maintain its 200 acres of sacred ground.

David Snodgrass is the president of the Professional Landcare Network, or PLANET, a trade group of landscaping companies that come together at Arlington Cemetery for one day each year, to donate labor and expertise, whether on irrigation, tree care, or lawn maintenance.

"Over the course of 14 years, it exceeds $2 million, so it's quite a significant contribution, our gift to America," says Snodgrass.

Some volunteers here are veterans, and say this year, donating their land care expertise is their way of helping the cemetery through tough times, after recent reports of poor management and mismarked graves.

But the industry will also be asking for help this week. Today Snodgrass and others will talk with lawmakers in Washington about how immigration laws affect the many landscaping industry workers who are foreign nationals here on seasonal work visas.

"We definitely need comprehensive reform, but we want to do it in a responsible way, that's an important workforce that we have," comments Snodgrass.

He says his colleagues will also be focusing on water restriction laws across the nation.

NPR

WWI Diaries Of Poet Siegfried Sassoon Go Public For First Time

Nearly a dozen notebooks and journals by the author, who fought in the British Army during the war, are being released to coincide with the centenary of the start of the conflict.
NPR

These Ivory Coast Cacao Farmers Had Never Tasted Chocolate

Ivory Coast is the world's No. 1 producer of the cacao beans that are the base of our beloved chocolate bars. But as a TV report shows, some cacao farmers have never enjoyed the final product.
NPR

Panel Says Plan To Cut Army Strength Goes Too Far

The Pentagon has recommended cutting troop strength to 450,000, but a bi-partisan report says that given the global threats, the reduction is too big.
NPR

Simmering Online Debate Shows Emoji Is In The Eye Of The Beholder

A report from a local Philadelphia TV station is re-igniting a debate and getting people all up in arms. (Or should we say, up in hands?)

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.