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Arundel Mills Slots Case Goes To Maryland's High Court

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Maryland's highest court is reviewing a legal case involving the state's proposed casino near Arundel Mills Mall.
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Maryland's highest court is reviewing a legal case involving the state's proposed casino near Arundel Mills Mall.

By Rebecca Baltt

A legal case involving Maryland's largest proposed casino goes before the state's highest court today, in the latest development in the controversy over a casino planned for the Arundel Mills Mall.

The Court of Appeals will hear arguments about whether a zoning measure, needed for the construction of the casino at the suburban mall in Anne Arundel County, is subject to a referendum on November's ballot.

Opponents of the casino brought enough signatures for a referendum to the county's Board of Elections in March. But Anne Arundel County Circuit Court Judge Ronald Silkworth ruled the ordnance is not subject to a referendum, because it is part of an appropriations package for maintaining state and local government.

Alan Rifkin, an attorney for Citizens Against Slots at the mall, says casinos are subject to local authority and subject to a referendum.

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