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Upcoming Free Clinic For D.C. Residents

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By Garrett Browne

A one-day free medical clinic is coming to D.C. next month. It's part of a national organization's effort to help Washingtonians who can't afford the care they need.

When the uninsured need health care and they can't afford a doctor, there aren't many places in D.C. where they can go for help.

Recognizing that, the National Association of Free Clinics will offer a no cost medical clinic on August 4th in Northwest D.C. at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center.

Executive Director Nicole Lamoureux says many Americans don't realize that being employed doesn't automatically mean a person has access to medical insurance.

"Eighty-three percent of the people who come to our clinics have a job or come from a working household," she says. "They just don't have access to affordable health care."

She says free clinics, rely on volunteers to provide many of the general medical services they offer.

"We need those doctors and nurses and nurse practitioner, medical students, nursing students," she says. "But we also need those people that just want to give back their time."

The free clinic at the convention center in August will operate from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.

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