: News

'Signature Idol' Is Crowned In Arlington, Virginia

Play associated audio

By Cathy Carter

The Washington region boasts a number of successful musical theatre performers. This weekend, the Signature Theatre in Arlington Virginia, held a competition to find the area's newest singing star.

People auditioned, 100 of them, but only ten local performers were chosen for Signature Idol, the theatre's quest to find the region's best singer.

Emily Rae from McLean, Virginia heard about the competition on Facebook. She's studying nursing at the University of Pennsylvania but says she'll always love performing.

"I think it is like the adrenaline and just the feeling that you get when you sing the right notes and are having fun," she says.

Another finalist is Miki Byrne from Fairfax, Virginia. She's pursuing a career in opera and musical theatre.

"I love singing because I'm a very shy introverted person and I think that when I'm on stage, I just really like being able to communicate with people, you know and kind of talk to people, I guess let my emotions out," says Byrne.

And the winner of Signature Idol: 24-year-old Gabriel Lopez of Germantown, Maryland.

NPR

A Biography Of Your Cubicle: How This Became The Modern Workplace

The office has long been seen as a symbol of boredom: It's a killer of spirits, a destroyer of spontaneity. But reviewer Rosecrans Baldwin says a new book brings out its entertaining side.
NPR

California Farmers Finagle A Fig For All Seasons

Two growers are competing to harvest fresh figs earlier and earlier in hopes of transforming the industry for year-round production. But some fig lovers say they can hold out for summer fruit.
WAMU 88.5

On National Mall, Native Americans Protest Keystone XL Pipeline

Native Americans from across the country are visiting Washington this week to protest the construction of a controversial pipeline in the Midwest.
NPR

Life Outside The Fast Lane: Startups Wary Of Web Traffic Plan

The Federal Communications Commission's proposal would let Web companies pay for faster access. But entrepreneurs, like Reddit's co-founder, are wondering how they would have fared with such rules.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.