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'Signature Idol' Is Crowned In Arlington, Virginia

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By Cathy Carter

The Washington region boasts a number of successful musical theatre performers. This weekend, the Signature Theatre in Arlington Virginia, held a competition to find the area's newest singing star.

People auditioned, 100 of them, but only ten local performers were chosen for Signature Idol, the theatre's quest to find the region's best singer.

Emily Rae from McLean, Virginia heard about the competition on Facebook. She's studying nursing at the University of Pennsylvania but says she'll always love performing.

"I think it is like the adrenaline and just the feeling that you get when you sing the right notes and are having fun," she says.

Another finalist is Miki Byrne from Fairfax, Virginia. She's pursuing a career in opera and musical theatre.

"I love singing because I'm a very shy introverted person and I think that when I'm on stage, I just really like being able to communicate with people, you know and kind of talk to people, I guess let my emotions out," says Byrne.

And the winner of Signature Idol: 24-year-old Gabriel Lopez of Germantown, Maryland.


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