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Fairfax Co. Supervisors Vent Frustration Over Deteriorating Roads

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By Jonathan Wilson

In Virginia, Fairfax's Board of Supervisors want the state to do a better job of maintaining the county's roads.

Fairfax County Supervisor Jeff McKay says maintaining infrastructure in Fairfax, and Northern Virginia as a whole, is different from other areas of the Commonwealth.

"We have pedestrian issues that have to be addressed, we have transit issues that have to be addressed, and we have road issues that have to be addressed, and not all places in Virginia have that," says McKay.

Fairfax Supervisors have unanimously voted to draft a letter to Virginia's Secretary of Transportation, pointing out the proliferation of potholes, fading lane and pedestrian road markings, and even trash on roads, problems the state is responsible for solving.

"We're trying real hard to revitalize certain parts of the community, and build back up property values in certain parts of the community, and when the road that leads into that community is crumbling, that is not helpful," he says.

McKay says he hopes the letter will prompt the Governor, who didn't respond to requests for comment, to call for a special session to address transportation funding.

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