DEA Seeks To Ban Synthetic Marijuana Drug | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

DEA Seeks To Ban Synthetic Marijuana Drug

Play associated audio

Federal Drug authorities are working to learn more about a synthetic drug known as K2, or Spice. It's showing up in novelty stores in the District, Maryland and Virginia, and it's legal in all three states.

Essentially K2 is just crushed green leaves infused with a chemical which can produce a marijuana like high when smoked. The chemical is a synthetic compound similar to the active element in pot, but intended for use in research.

Special Agent Gary Boggs of the Drug Enforcement Administration says, "The problem is we don't know what the long term effects are of these chemicals. We do know that they've caused side effects and that people are going to the hospital as a result of taking these chemicals."

The package labels clearly indicates the product is intended for use as incense and not meant for human consumption. Boggs says although the DEA is moving quickly to make K2 illegal under federal law, some states are taking the initiative.

"I believe 4 or 5 states have legislation and a couple of others are looking at it as well," he says.

Last week, Missouri signed legislation into law banning K2. Currently, no such legislation exist in D.C., M.D. or V.A.

NPR

Emmy Awards 2014: Safe Choices In A Time Of Groundbreaking TV

NPR TV critic Eric Deggans says Monday's Emmy Awards promised to recognize TV's emerging future — but ultimately rewarded comfortable favorites over disruptive upstarts.
NPR

Colorado's Pot Brownies Now Come With Instructions

Colorado is rolling out regulations for the edible-marijuana sector, including "emergency rules," which spell out serving sizes. But for now, most of the dosage education is falling to pot shops.
WAMU 88.5

Cross-Examination Comes To Dramatic End In McDonnell Corruption Trial

U.S. Attorney Michael Dry wrapped his cross-examination of the former governor, borrowing a quote from McDonnell's own inauguration speech.
NPR

Depressed Teens May Need Extra Support To Stick With Treatment

Enlisting parents to make sure teens get counseling is a start, but a lot of families need more support, research suggests. Even finding the right therapist can be daunting.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.