D.C. Is Bidding To Bring European Cycling Event To The Nation's Capital | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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D.C. Is Bidding To Bring European Cycling Event To The Nation's Capital

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By Cathy Carter

One of the world's largest sporting events is hoping to increase its visibility in the U.S and local organizers say Washington D.C. can help them do that.

Professional cycling returned to Washington over the weekend with the Capital Criterium. Race Director Mark Sommers now turns his attention to bringing one of the sports most famous cycling tours to the district.

"The Giro D'Italia is the tour of Italy. It is a three week grand European tour race, like its French counterpart, the Tour De France, and the idea behind the 2012 bid is to bring two of those stages to the nation's capital," says Sommers.

If the Giro D'Italia does comes to D.C. it will make sports history.

"No other grand European tour has ever started outside of Europe," says Sommers.

It is still uncertain when the decision will be announced, but local boosters say D.C. has already beat out such North American cities as Boston, Philadelphia and New York City. Organizers say the event would generate millions of dollars for the district.

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