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Congresswoman Norton To Introduce National Dance Day

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By Kavitha Cardoza

D.C.'s Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton got a shout out on the national television show "So You Think You Can Dance."

Celebrity judge Nigel Lythgoe called it the "most incredible news." Eleanor Holmes Norton, who represents the District of Columbia, is going to introduce a bill into the House of Representatives to make July the 31st the National Dance Day.

Norton says she's doing it to promote healthy lifestyles. She says childhood obesity has tripled in the past 30 years and dancing is a way to promote physical fitness.

"There's going to be a big flash mob there on the 31st of July," she says. "Look at all these Congressmen and women doing it. Fantastic! It's going to be brilliant."

No word yet whether celebrity judges will be posting scores.

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