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Prevent Broken Air Conditioning Units

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By Natalie Neumann

Air conditioning repair technicians are working overtime to help people beat the heat, and letting people know some things you can do to prevent a visit.

Jason Welch works as a technician for Thomas E. Clark, a plumbing, heating and A/C company in Silver Spring, Maryland. He carries a tool kit, gauges, and a ladder up the stairs of a townhouse in Georgetown. It's cool on the first floor, but as you climb the stairs to the third it gets hotter and you can tell the air conditioning isn't working.

"This customer has a dirty filter so the indoor coil has frozen solid," says Welch.

The filter needs to be replaced and the coil thawed. He says this problem is common, yet easily preventable by checking the filter.

"Make sure they've been cleaned. Change them regularly, once a month," he says.

Welch says it's important to keep the central air conditioning unit clear from obstructions like bushes so air can circulate. Before calling a technician, he also suggests checking the circuit breaker to make sure electricity to the unit is working.

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