: News

Prevent Broken Air Conditioning Units

Play associated audio

By Natalie Neumann

Air conditioning repair technicians are working overtime to help people beat the heat, and letting people know some things you can do to prevent a visit.

Jason Welch works as a technician for Thomas E. Clark, a plumbing, heating and A/C company in Silver Spring, Maryland. He carries a tool kit, gauges, and a ladder up the stairs of a townhouse in Georgetown. It's cool on the first floor, but as you climb the stairs to the third it gets hotter and you can tell the air conditioning isn't working.

"This customer has a dirty filter so the indoor coil has frozen solid," says Welch.

The filter needs to be replaced and the coil thawed. He says this problem is common, yet easily preventable by checking the filter.

"Make sure they've been cleaned. Change them regularly, once a month," he says.

Welch says it's important to keep the central air conditioning unit clear from obstructions like bushes so air can circulate. Before calling a technician, he also suggests checking the circuit breaker to make sure electricity to the unit is working.

NPR

Ricky Gervais On Controversial Jokes, Celebrities And 'Special Correspondents'

"I didn't go out there to ruin everyone's day or undermine the moral fabric of America. I was making jokes." Gervais talked with NPR's Rachel Martin about his new movie and how he approaches humor.
NPR

When It Came To Food, Neanderthals Weren't Exactly Picky Eaters

During the Ice Age, it seems Neanderthals tended to chow down on whatever was most readily available. Early humans, on the other hand, maintained a consistent diet regardless of environmental changes.
NPR

President Obama Has His Last Laughs At 2016 White House Correspondents' Dinner

In eighth and his last correspondents' dinner on Saturday evening, Obama didn't pull punches with his fellow politicos — but he did pull a last-minute mic drop.
NPR

'The Guardian' Launches New Series Examining Online Abuse

A video was released this week where female sports journalists were read abusive online comments to their face. It's an issue that reaches far beyond that group, and The Guardian is taking it on in a series called "The Web We Want." NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with series editor Becky Gardiner and writer Nesrine Malik, who receives a lot of online abuse.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.