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Pepco Explains Delay In NE Neighborhood Repairs

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Pepco crews work to replace an old conduit with upgraded cable to accommodate the needs of a growing neighborhood.
Elliott Francis
Pepco crews work to replace an old conduit with upgraded cable to accommodate the needs of a growing neighborhood.

By Elliot Francis

The difficulty of restoring electricity this week to one Northeast D.C. neighborhood is compounded by property improvements made by area homeowners.

The H Street corridor around 12 Street NE, is a neighborhood on the rise. Clay Anderson, spokesperson for Pepco says home renovations, including power panel upgrades in this neighborhood of older structures, have changed how Pepco effects repairs.

"Many of these homes in the area, when the wires were first put underground, they were able to handle the load. The homes you see now, they're putting out a lot of electricity," says Anderson.

Instead of just replacing damaged cables, repairman had to swap out much of the old cable in the area to avoid an overload, and that took longer.

Bill Dunn lives on 12th Street:

"...that makes sense considering we recently got central AC. We probably added to that ourselves," says Dunn.

Anderson says repairs should be competed by Thursday morning.

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