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ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) A former aide to state Sen. Andrew Harris is formally in the race for a House of Delegates seat in a legislative district that includes parts of Baltimore and Harford counties. Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller told Harris that Kathy Szeliga should resign her position because she was running for office.

BALTIMORE (AP) Maryland health officials say the extreme heat has been linked to the death of a Baltimore resident. The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene announced yesterday that an adult resident of Baltimore was found dead in a home with air temperatures more than 90 degrees.

BALTIMORE (AP) The fundamentalist church that picketed the funeral of a Marine killed in Iraq says its actions are constitutionally protected. An attorney for the Westboro Baptist Church submitted a 75-page brief to the U.S. Supreme Court yesterday. Albert Snyder is suing the church, claiming that the First Amendment did not allow the protesters to disrupt his right to peacefully assemble for his son's funeral.

(Copyright 2010 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

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