Women's Wimbledon Champion Headed For D.C. | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Women's Wimbledon Champion Headed For D.C.

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By Cathy Carter

Professional tennis returns to D.C. tonight when The Washington Kastles host their home opener, and the team boasts a new star player.

Serena Williams, you've just won Wimbledon. What are you going to do next? No, she's not going to Disney World.

Williams is headed for D.C. to join her sister Venus Williams as a member of the Washington Kastles, of the World Team Tennis League.

"You know when you see the kids sitting on a tennis court hitting, and then Serena or Venus come in and start to teach them how to play, it's priceless, and hopefully an experience that they never forget," says team owner, Mark Ein.

He says this summer the Kastles will host dozens of tennis clinics for disadvantaged kids.

The Williams sisters attended a similar program growing up in Compton, California.

"You hope that you provide that kind of inspiration for kids in our city who may not have a chance to see those kinds of opportunities otherwise," says Ein.

The Washington Kastles season begins tonight, and on Wednesday, Venus Williams will face Martina Hingis at the team's home stadium in downtown D.C.

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