: News

Environmentalists, Watermen At Odds Over Sanctuaries

Play associated audio

By Sabri Ben-Achour

Maryland is asking for input from the public on it's plans to set aside 25 percent of the bay as Oyster sanctuary.

Watermen and environmentalists are at odds over the plan.

Out on the Severn river near Annapolis, Chesapeake Bay Foundation Scientist Stephanie Westbay has just pulled up a chunk of thriving oyster reef the size of her head; it's dripping with crabs and aquatic worms.

"You can see that a lot of other life has started to colonize these reefs," he says. "Not only do these oysters filter the water in the Chesapeake Bay, they also provide phenomenal habitat for a lot of other species."

She says this is proof that sanctuaries work, and that Maryland needs more of them.

Larry Simms is president of the Maryland Waterman's Association. He says the state is severely underestimating the impact on watermen, and worries that Maryland is going to declare off limits the few remaining areas of the bay where oysters thrive.

"That's all this is is an experiment, a grandiose experiment at our cost," he says.

But many scientists insist there's nothing experimental about sanctuaries, and that oysters won't recover without them.

NPR

Remembering Robert Swanson, Advertising's 'King Of Jingles'

Robert Swanson revolutionized American advertising and wrote some of the most memorable ad jingles of the 1950s and '60s for products ranging from Campbell's Soup to Pall Mall cigarettes. He died at 95 July 17 at his home in Phoenix, Ariz.
NPR

More Than Just Saying 'Cheese,' Hundreds Sit Test To Become Official Experts

The American Cheese Society will begin proctoring its next Certified Cheese Professional Exam in Des Moines, Iowa, on Wednesday, during the group's annual conference.
WAMU 88.5

Democratic National Convention Day Two: Uniting The Party

An update on day two of the Democratic convention: Bill Clinton takes the stage and ongoing efforts by party leaders to build unity.

WAMU 88.5

How To Help Teens And Children Fight 'Tech Addiction'

Many parents and therapists say obsessive internet use is a very real problem for some teens and children. But the term “internet addiction” is controversial and not officially recognized as a disorder. How to help kids who compulsively use computers and mobile technology.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.