: News

Environmentalists, Watermen At Odds Over Sanctuaries

Play associated audio

By Sabri Ben-Achour

Maryland is asking for input from the public on it's plans to set aside 25 percent of the bay as Oyster sanctuary.

Watermen and environmentalists are at odds over the plan.

Out on the Severn river near Annapolis, Chesapeake Bay Foundation Scientist Stephanie Westbay has just pulled up a chunk of thriving oyster reef the size of her head; it's dripping with crabs and aquatic worms.

"You can see that a lot of other life has started to colonize these reefs," he says. "Not only do these oysters filter the water in the Chesapeake Bay, they also provide phenomenal habitat for a lot of other species."

She says this is proof that sanctuaries work, and that Maryland needs more of them.

Larry Simms is president of the Maryland Waterman's Association. He says the state is severely underestimating the impact on watermen, and worries that Maryland is going to declare off limits the few remaining areas of the bay where oysters thrive.

"That's all this is is an experiment, a grandiose experiment at our cost," he says.

But many scientists insist there's nothing experimental about sanctuaries, and that oysters won't recover without them.

NPR

Book Review: 'In Praise Of Hatred'

Alan Cheuse reviews the novel In Praise of Hatred, by Khaled Khalifa. The book, which was recently translated to English, features a young Muslim girl in 1980s Syria.
NPR

Fast-Food CEOs Earn Supersize Salaries; Workers Earn Small Potatoes

A new report finds that the average compensation of fast-food CEOs has quadrupled since 2000. By comparison, worker wages have increased less than 1 percent.
NPR

Green GOP Group Caught Between 'Rock And A Hard Place'

On Earth Day 2014, it wasn't easy being an environmental organization in the Republican Party. The big donors who write checks aren't much interested in the environment.
NPR

The Price War Over The Cloud Has High Stakes For The Internet

Amazon, Google, Microsoft and others are competing to be the main landlords of the cloud. Their terms and prices could control who gets to build what on the Internet, and for how much.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.