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Docs Advise Local Residents to Stay Inside and Avoid Hot Temps

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By Natalie Neumann

As temperatures rise close to triple digits, people in the area are advised to stay inside.

Greg Marchand is an Emergency Room Physician at Washington Hospital Center. He says people should use common sense when trying to beat the heat.

"We recommend that people not over exert themselves and stay out of the direct heat if at all possible. They should be wearing cool, breathable clothing, ideally cotton and should stay very well hydrated," Marchand says.

Marchand encourages staying away from caffeinated drinks that can be dehydrating.

Gail Morgan -- has found one way to keep cool. She's walking in the shade of a building downtown.

"I am enjoying keeping cool because I’m licking on an ice cream cone right now. And by the time I get to my destination I might have a bottle of water thrown on my head," Morgan says.

Marchand urges people to check on neighbors, especially the elderly.

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