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Police Threaten Fines If Water Restrictions Not Followed

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By Natalie Neumann

The Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission says customers in Maryland's Montgomery and Prince George's Counties aren't conserving water as much as they'd like while a damaged water pipe is being repaired.

Police are writing warnings and threatening to fine residents who don't comply with the mandatory restrictions.

The WSSC asked customers on Thursday to stop all outside water use and to use water inside only as necessary in hopes to cut usage by a third.

The restrictions are expected to last until at least Monday.

Meanwhile, police say people don't follow the guidelines could face fines of as much as five hundred dollars.

Michael Sewell lives a couple blocks from the pipe that's being repaired in Potomac, Maryland.

He says the fine is steep.

"They should definately encourage environmentally friendly activities but I don't think they should fine you if you don't do it," he says.

But the WSSC says compliance is critical -- to ensure there's enough water for fire protection and medical uses.


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