: News

Park Services Emphasize Safety For The Holiday Weekend

Play associated audio

By Natalie Neumann

After a mother and daughter drowned in the Potomac River on Memorial Day this year, the Potomac River Safety Task Force is taking extra precautions to prevent any river accidents this holiday weekend.

In the past 15 months the Potomac River has claimed the lives of 8 people, all whom did not speak English as their first language.

Kevin Brandt is superintendent of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park. He says more than 50 sets of signs in English, Spanish and Vietnamese are now posted along the Potomac River Gorge from Great Falls Park to the Memorial Bridge in D.C.

"We're adding rotating tri-lingual banners at multiple locations using non-traditional sign formats to attract more attention," says Brandt.

The signs warn of the dangers of the river.

Maryland's Montgomery County Executive Isiah Leggett says the water may seem calm, but beneath the surface the undertow and currents are not.

"What seems like a harmless way to cool off is really an invitation to death," says Leggett.

Police will be writing citations throughout the holiday weekend for swimming or wading in the river, which is illegal.

NPR

In Pakistan, Literary Spring Is Both Renaissance And Resistance

For the past decade Pakistan has faced war, political instability and the rise of religious extremism. But those crises have fueled a new generation of Pakistani writers and artists.
NPR

Behold Ukrainian Easter Art: Incredible, Inedible Eggs

Even 2,000 years ago, people seemed to know that the egg could be a source of life. And an ancient art form has been passed down, transforming a symbolic source of food into a dazzling decoration.
NPR

Obama's Tax Rate Rose — And He Can't Blame Anyone But Himself

President Obama, like many wealthy Americans, is paying more of his income to the IRS. He and the first lady paid $98,169 in taxes for 2013 on income of $481,098.
NPR

Between Heartbleed And Homeland, NSA Treads Cybersecurity Gray Area

Amid controversy over the Heartbleed security bug, the White House clarified how U.S. intelligence agencies must handle such bugs. Bloomberg Businessweek cybersecurity reporter Michael Riley explains.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.