: News

McDonnell Backs Off Metro Threats With Little Time To Spare

Play associated audio

By David Schultz

Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell is demanding more authority over how Metro spends the Commonwealth's money. He wants to appoint his representatives to Metro's Board of Directors. But McDonnell is backing off threats to withhold funding from Metro until it agreed to his demands.

Metro had to approve its funding agreement so it could honor a contract to purchase new, safer rail cars. It couldn't do that until McDonnell acquiesced, and he did so with just hours to spare late last night.

Metro Board Member Chris Zimmerman, a Democrat from Arlington County, says McDonnell was trying to play hardball, and lost.

"They clearly had not looked into it very well," says Zimmerman. "They hadn't talked to anybody. They sprung this within the last month. And so, they didn't know what they were doing."

Not so, says Thelma Drake, director of McDonnell's Department of Rail and Public Transit. She says this was not a loss for the Governor.

"Governor McDonnell never thinks that it's a loss to protect the citizens of the Commonwealth and the citizens of our great nation who might be using the Metro system," says Drake.

Drake says the McDonnell administration will continue to lobby for the ability to appoint people to the Metro Board.

NPR

How Fishermen's Bragging Rights Gave Birth To Fine Art

In 19th century Japan, fishermen found a foolproof way to record trophy catches: a "fish rubbing" inked onto paper, creating a permanent record of their size. Gyotaku soon evolved into fine art.
NPR

How Fishermen's Bragging Rights Gave Birth To Fine Art

In 19th century Japan, fishermen found a foolproof way to record trophy catches: a "fish rubbing" inked onto paper, creating a permanent record of their size. Gyotaku soon evolved into fine art.
NPR

Donald Trump In 9 Quotes And 200 Seconds

Trump took his act on the road to Tennessee, where he thrilled a conservative audience with an off-the-cuff routine that bordered on stand-up comedy.
NPR

No More Standing By The Spigot: Messaging App Alerts Water Availability

A startup in India — where an aging, ad hoc system limits water availability — is using text messages to let people know when their faucets should work, so they don't waste hours awaiting the deluge.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.