: News

McDonnell Backs Off Metro Threats With Little Time To Spare

Play associated audio

By David Schultz

Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell is demanding more authority over how Metro spends the Commonwealth's money. He wants to appoint his representatives to Metro's Board of Directors. But McDonnell is backing off threats to withhold funding from Metro until it agreed to his demands.

Metro had to approve its funding agreement so it could honor a contract to purchase new, safer rail cars. It couldn't do that until McDonnell acquiesced, and he did so with just hours to spare late last night.

Metro Board Member Chris Zimmerman, a Democrat from Arlington County, says McDonnell was trying to play hardball, and lost.

"They clearly had not looked into it very well," says Zimmerman. "They hadn't talked to anybody. They sprung this within the last month. And so, they didn't know what they were doing."

Not so, says Thelma Drake, director of McDonnell's Department of Rail and Public Transit. She says this was not a loss for the Governor.

"Governor McDonnell never thinks that it's a loss to protect the citizens of the Commonwealth and the citizens of our great nation who might be using the Metro system," says Drake.

Drake says the McDonnell administration will continue to lobby for the ability to appoint people to the Metro Board.

NPR

Barbershop: UofL Basketball Ban, Football Concussions And The NFL Women's Summit

ESPN contributor Kevin Blackistone, Bloomberg View's Kavitha Davidson and The Washington Post's Wesley Lowery talk about the UofL basketball team, public opinion of the NFL, and women in sports.
NPR

After Introducing Changes, Keurig Sales Continue To Fall

Despite America's high coffee consumption, Keurig reported disappointing sales this week. Even during its popular holiday selling period, the numbers haven't perked up in recent years.
NPR

With A Little Help From Larry David, Bernie Sanders Does SNL

Bernie Sanders impersonator Larry David hosted the episode with a cameo from the senator himself. Sanders slipped in a main campaign message, while David jabbed at the candidate's cantankerous side.
NPR

How Limited Internet Access Can Subtract From Kids' Education

Smartphones are often credited with helping bridge the "digital divide" between people who do and don't have Internet access at home. But is mobile Internet enough for a family with a kid in school?

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.