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House Committee Expresses Confidence In Arlington National Cemetery Plan

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The House Armed Services Committee held a congressional hearing after a federal investigation revealed misidentified bodies, mismarked graves, and improperly handled remains.
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The House Armed Services Committee held a congressional hearing after a federal investigation revealed misidentified bodies, mismarked graves, and improperly handled remains.

By Sara Sciammacco

House Armed Services Committee members are expressing some confidence in the Army Secretary’s plan for Arlington National Cemetery. They held a congressional hearing after a federal investigation earlier this month found graves that were mismarked, bodies misidentified, and remains that were improperly handled.

Secretary John McHugh said the Army should continue the role of overseeing the national site. But he acknowledged it will take time to rebuild the trust that’s been lost. He told the House committee he has created an oversight team and advisory commission to help restructure the cemetery.

“That ground is the final resting place of America’s great heroes but I do believe nearly over the last century half the army has helped to polish that reputation clearly that record has been tarnished we are committed fully to regaining that kind of record into the future," says McHugh.

The investigation also found financial contracting irregularities involving millions of dollars. Review and analysis of the cemetery’s resources are ongoing, as are efforts to respond to the concerns of affected families.

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