: News

Filed Under:

Congress Members Grill Officials Over Arlington National Cemetery Controversy

Play associated audio

By Sara Sciammacco

The nation's most revered military burial site has been mired in scandal since early June, when a federal investigation unearthed a shocking pattern of neglect and mismanagement. Today the House Armed Services Committee, which includes several Virginia and Maryland lawmakers, grilled the military and civilian officials in charge of Arlington National Cemetery.

The investigation found graves that were mismarked, bodies that had been misidentified, and remains that were improperly handled.

Army Secretary John McHugh responded to Virginia Republican Rob Whitman.

"Can you give us an idea of how that was allowed to continue to occur and for that dysfunctional organizational structure there to continue?" Whitman asks.

"I wish I had the answers to that, congressman," says McHugh. "A lot of this is conjecture, we are talking back to '97, '92, so well over a decade, and a lot of the people who were directly involved are gone. I will say this: there is no excuse why it happened."

McHugh said he has created an oversight team and advisory commission to help restructure the cemetery. He also said the Army should continue the role of overseeing the national site.

WAMU 88.5

Readers' Review: "The Good Lord Bird" By James McBride

For our next Readers' Review: National Book Award winner "The Good Lord Bird" by James McBride. The 2013 novel follows an enslaved boy who gets caught up in John Brown's abolitionist mission...and must disguise himself as a girl to survive.

WAMU 88.5

Busboys And Poets In Anacostia: Development Or Gentrification?

Local restaurant chain Busboys and Poets will soon open in Anacostia, which suffers from a dearth of dining and shopping options-- but some within the community are decrying the opening as gentrification.

WAMU 88.5

A Primary Challenge For A Top Arlington County Democrat

Could bipartisanship be the ouster of Arlington County's board chair?

NPR

In Omaha, A Library With No Books Brings Technology To All

The privately funded, $7 million Do Space provides free access to computers, high-end software, 3-D printers, and laser cutters. It's a learning and play space, as well as an office for entrepreneurs.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.