: News

Chesapeake Bay Legislation Closer To Becoming Law

Play associated audio
The Chesapeake Clean Water and Ecosystem Restoration Act gives local governments and farmers $2 billion to help them reduce runoff and renovate stormwater infrastructure.
http://www.flickr.com/thisisbossi/
The Chesapeake Clean Water and Ecosystem Restoration Act gives local governments and farmers $2 billion to help them reduce runoff and renovate stormwater infrastructure.

By Sabri Ben-Achour

A major piece of legislation designed to restore the Chesapeake Bay is one step closer to passage. The Chesapeake Clean Water and Ecosystem Restoration Act made it out of committee Wednesday relatively unscathed.

The legislation would give the Environmental Protection Agency and states in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed two things: money and authority. The EPA is already developing limits on pollution and demanding that states reign in their stormwater runoff, but this legislation makes those demands law. Senator Ben Cardin from Maryland sponsored the bill.

"It puts teeth in the Chesapeake Bay Program by making it clear that the goals that we set need to be accomplished," he says.

If they're not, it authorizes the EPA to cutoff funding to states or even to take over their implementation programs.

And then there's the money: $2 billion to help local governments and farmers renovate stormwater infrastructure and reduce runoff.

"With the bill, we have a hope of getting the job done in 15 years," says Doug Siglin, with the Chesapeake Bay Foundation. "Without the bill, we could get it done sometime in the future, but it's impossible to predict when."

In committee the bill received bipartisan support. That was made possible by several amendments that sought to prevent the EPA from widening it's jurisdiction beyond the areas it currently covers.

Siglin says those amendments won't affect Chesapeake restoration. A full vote hasn't been scheduled yet.

NPR

Remembering Robert Swanson, Advertising's 'King Of Jingles'

Robert Swanson revolutionized American advertising and wrote some of the most memorable ad jingles of the 1950s and '60s for products ranging from Campbell's Soup to Pall Mall cigarettes. He died at 95 July 17 at his home in Phoenix, Ariz.
NPR

In Alaska's Remote Towns, Climate Change Is Already Leaving Many Hungry

Melting ice has made it harder to hunt walrus, a traditional staple for Native Alaskans. Warmer temps mean caribou aren't where hunters used to find them. It all adds up to more food insecurity.
WAMU 88.5

Democratic National Convention Day Two: Uniting The Party

An update on day two of the Democratic convention: Bill Clinton takes the stage and ongoing efforts by party leaders to build unity.

WAMU 88.5

How To Help Teens And Children Fight 'Tech Addiction'

Many parents and therapists say obsessive internet use is a very real problem for some teens and children. But the term “internet addiction” is controversial and not officially recognized as a disorder. How to help kids who compulsively use computers and mobile technology.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.