Sunday Marks 16th Annual National HIV Testing Day | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Filed Under:

Sunday Marks 16th Annual National HIV Testing Day

Play associated audio

By Cathy Carter

Today is National HIV Testing Day, and communities throughout the region are encouraging at-risk residents to seek out free screenings.

The Whitman-Walker Clinic in D.C. is just one of the facilities offering expanded HIV testing to mark this 16th annual National HIV Testing Day.

Pernell Williams is the clinic's Community Health Manager.

He says that one of the ways to erase the stigma surrounding HIV is for families to get involved, and encourage testing.

"People don't neccesarily listen to strangers just as well as they would listen to a father figure, a mother figure, a brother, a peer," he says.

Williams worries about people becoming complacent about the virus. He hopes this year's event will mark the beginning of a new movement.

"That it began on this weekend, on this National HIV Testing Day, and that it was indeed the beginning of the end for HIV," he says.

The clinic will sponsor free rapid HIV testing at their 14th Street location, and at various mobile testing centers District-wide.

NPR

Snubs And Successes: 6 Lessons Learned From This Year's Emmy Nominations

HBO's Game of Thrones emerged as the most-nominated series with 19 nods for the Primetime Emmy Awards, but new series such as FX's Fargo and HBO's True Detective scored, too.
NPR

'Captain Pizza' Saves The Day, But Doesn't Save Himself A Slice

A pilot found himself hungry during a midflight delay. But instead of just buying a pizza for himself, he bought 50 pizzas for the entire Frontier Airlines plane.
NPR

In Texas, Obama Sets Stage To Answer 'Do-Nothing' Congress

President Obama knows he's unlikely to get support from Texas' predominantly Republican congressional delegation, but being rebuffed will make it easier for him to shift blame to the GOP.
NPR

A New Device Lets You Track Your Preschooler ... And Listen In

LG's KizON wristband lets you keep tabs on your child. But some experts say such devices send the wrong message about the world we live in. And the gadgets raise questions about kids' privacy rights.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.