Muslim Men's Lawyers Vow To Appeal | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Muslim Men's Lawyers Vow To Appeal

Play associated audio

By Rebecca Sheir

Defense lawyers for the five Muslim men convicted of terror plots in Pakistan are vowing to appeal the ruling.

The president of the mosque in Virginia where the young men worshiped says their attorneys and families believe the evidence was faked and the men are innocent.

Standing outside the mosque in Alexandria, Virginia, Mohammad Zahid Khan says mosque members were surprised by the verdict, and the accompanying 10-year prison sentence for the five American Muslim men.

"Everybody was expecting they would get released," says Khan, "Because the prosecution has no strong case against them. They have a very weak case."

Khan says that's why the young men's lawyers and loved ones are determined to overturn the conviction.

"It appears that their attorney and their families want to proceed their case in the high court," he says.

Khan says he's concerned about the men's alleged torture during interrogations by Pakistani police and FBI agents.

The community is praying for the young men and their families, he says and trying to maintain faith in the justice system.

NPR

The Gift Of Eternal Shelf Life: 'Tuck Everlasting' Turns 40

In Natalie Babbitt's celebrated classic, a young girl stumbles upon a secret spring and the family the spring has given eternal life to. Babbitt says she wrote the book to help kids understand death.
NPR

Food Industry Drags Its Heels On Recyclable And Compostable Packaging

A new report from two environmental groups reviewed the recyclability and compostability of packaging from 47 food companies. It found few examples of companies that have prioritized waste reduction.
NPR

Guantanamo Bay A Sticking Point Between U.S., Cuba Since 1903

Guantanamo Bay is home to the United States' oldest overseas base. Melissa Block talks to Vanderbilt History Professor Paul Kramer.
NPR

With 'Discover' Feature, Snapchat Bucks Social Trend In News

Snapchat says social media likes and shares aren't what makes a story important. The ephemeral messaging app has rolled out Discover, featuring multimedia articles from major news brands.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.