: News

Filed Under:

Animal Advocates Urge Local Pet Owners To Keep Pets Cool

Play associated audio
Animal experts say pets love air-conditioning in the summer just as much as humans do.
Jonathan Wilson
Animal experts say pets love air-conditioning in the summer just as much as humans do.

By Jonathan Wilson

The 90-degree days are starting to string together in the D.C. area, and animal advocates are urging pet owners to remember that heatstroke can be a problem for dogs and cats, as well as humans.

Susan Sherman, with the Arlington Animal Welfare League, says summer is when animal shelters are full: it's the breeding season.

"It's more for us with cats, that's where the huge influx comes in for us it's litters of kittens," Sherman says.

But keeping the stray animal population down isn't the only reason to keep your pet indoors--Sherman says some pets can be just as sensitive to hot weather as humans.

She says one way dog owners can beat the heat is to walk their dogs in the early morning hours. And if it's hot, remember that dogs can't cool off by sweating like humans do.

"They can only cool themselves by panting, so heavy panting is a sign that your dog is getting over-heated," she says.

The summer sun can also do serious damage to dog or cat noses, especially if they're light in color.

Sherman says a dab of sunscreen, the same kind you'd use on yourself, can help.

NPR

'Star Wars' Editors Defy Hollywood Conventions

In a film industry often dominated by men, there's at least one exception: Many editors are women. Maryann Brandon and Mary Jo Markey speak about their work on the new Star Wars.
NPR

Florida Says Its Fruits, Vegetables Are Safe From Invasive Fruit Fly

Since September, Florida has been fighting an infestation of the Oriental fruit fly, an invasive pest that threatened more than 400 crops. The state declared the insect eradicated as of Saturday.
NPR

The Senate Battle That Looms For Scalia's Replacement

NPR's Domenico Montanaro discusses the upcoming battle on Capitol Hill on replace the late Justice Antonin Scalia on the Supreme Court.
NPR

Colonialism Comment Puts Facebook Under Scrutiny

A Facebook board member lambasted a decision by regulators in India, the social network's second-largest market. He thereby sparked new scrutiny of Facebook's intentions in that country.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.