Transit Heads Apologize As MARC Probe Begins | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Transit Heads Apologize As MARC Probe Begins

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By Rebecca Sheir

Maryland Transit Administration is still struggling to determine why nearly 1,000 commuters were stranded on a MARC train in sweltering heat earlier this week.

As an investigation gets underway, transit heads are trying to make good with the public.

MTA Administrator Ralign T. Wells spent most of last night apologizing to MARC passengers.

First while meeting and greeting them at D.C.s Union Station then while handing out free tickets on the train platform and finally, while walking the aisles of the 538 train.

The same train that stalled on the tracks earlier this week. Peter Theis was on board, and says it took him four hours to get home that night: the same amount of time it takes to get to New York City.

Amtrak is joining MTA in the probe, along with the Federal Railroad Administration. In a letter to MARC passengers, Amtraks CEO says the agencies are evaluating their procedures, should a similar situation occur.

He ends with the words: We should do better, and we will do better.

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