: News

Filed Under:

Transit Heads Apologize As MARC Probe Begins

Play associated audio

By Rebecca Sheir

Maryland Transit Administration is still struggling to determine why nearly 1,000 commuters were stranded on a MARC train in sweltering heat earlier this week.

As an investigation gets underway, transit heads are trying to make good with the public.

MTA Administrator Ralign T. Wells spent most of last night apologizing to MARC passengers.

First while meeting and greeting them at D.C.s Union Station then while handing out free tickets on the train platform and finally, while walking the aisles of the 538 train.

The same train that stalled on the tracks earlier this week. Peter Theis was on board, and says it took him four hours to get home that night: the same amount of time it takes to get to New York City.

Amtrak is joining MTA in the probe, along with the Federal Railroad Administration. In a letter to MARC passengers, Amtraks CEO says the agencies are evaluating their procedures, should a similar situation occur.

He ends with the words: We should do better, and we will do better.

NBC4 Video:

View more news videos at: http://www.nbcwashington.com/video.

NPR

Opulent And Apolitical: The Art Of The Met's Islamic Galleries

Navina Haidar, an Islamic art curator at the Met, says she isn't interested in ideology: "The only place where we allow ourselves any passion is in the artistic joy ... of something that's beautiful."
NPR

Here's The Buzz On America's Forgotten Native 'Tea' Plant

It's called yaupon. Native Americans once made a brew from its caffeinated leaves and traded them widely. With several companies now selling yaupon, it may be poised for a comeback.
WAMU 88.5

Fannie Lou Hamer and the Fight for Voting Rights

Kojo explores the life and legacy of Fannie Lou Hamer, a poor Mississippi sharecropper who became an outspoken voice in the civil rights movement and the fight for voting rights.

WAMU 88.5

Computer Guys and Gal

Chrysler recalls cars to boost their cybersecurity. Microsoft debuts its new Windows 10 operating system. And navigation tech could bring us robotic lawn mowers. The Computer Guys and Gal explain.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.