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Feds Announce Members Of Rail Transit Safety Panel

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WASHINGTON (AP) Federal transportation officials are announcing the members of an advisory committee that will help develop national safety standards for rail transit.

The Department of Transportation has been prohibited from issuing safety regulations for rail transit systems since 1965, but Congress is considering legislation authorizing such oversight.

If the legislation passes, the 20-member Transit Rail Advisory Committee for Safety announced Wednesday by U.S. Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood will guide the Federal Transit Administration's safety rule-making agenda.

The committee is comprised of safety and rail transit experts and stakeholders from across the country.

Earlier this week, members of Congress from the Washington region marked the anniversary of Metrorail's deadliest crash and called on colleagues to pass the legislation.

(Copyright 2010 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

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