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Riders Express Concern For Metro Safety One Year After Crash

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By Stephanie Kaye

Today is the one year anniversary of the Metro crash that killed nine people at the Fort Totten Metro Station. The Metro crash is on the front cover of the free newspapers being handed out this morning at Metro stations. A large photo shows the crumpled train and safety-vest wearing workers on the scene.

Brenda Monk held a copy of the paper in her hand as she waited for the elevator at the Tenleytown station, and says the crash is definitely on her mind this morning.

"I've always thought about it, ever since the accident," she says. "More and more accidents have happened, the safety doesn't seem to be put in the forefront."

Although some say the crash put new focus on Metro safety, and Metro officials insist they are working to make the ride as safe as possible, Monk says she hasn't seen any changes for the better since last year's accident.

"I can't believe that actually happened," she says. "And not only that - it doesn't seem like a lot has happened since then." "When most crashes happen, it looks like somebody has done something--improved the safety record. And still, there's not a lot of information coming out about the accident."

A memorial ceremony will be held at 10 a.m. this morning at the Fort Totten Metro Station, with a moment of silence throughout the Metro system at 10:30.

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