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Metro Marks One Year Anniversary Of Crash

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One year later questions still remain regarding Metro safety as the city mourns and commemorates those lost in last years crash.
One year later questions still remain regarding Metro safety as the city mourns and commemorates those lost in last years crash.

By Sabri Ben-Achour

Metro is marking the one year anniversary of a train crash that killed nine people and injured dozens on the red line. The transit agency is holding a remembrance ceremony at the Fort Totten Metrorail station to honor those who died or were injured and the first responders who came to their aid.

Metro will observe a moment of silence in all Metrorail stations, rail yards, bus facilities and Metro administrative offices at 10:30 a.m. and invite employees, customers and people throughout the region to pause for a moment of silence and reflection.

The families of those who died have been invited to unveil a bronze plaque and lay a wreath in their honor.

Maryland Senators Barbara Mikulski and Ben Cardin marked the anniversary by promising funding for safety and announcing legislation requiring Metro to follow federal safety recommendations.

While national safety standards exist for buses, airplanes, and commuter rail systems, there are no binding standards for transit services.

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