Investigation Underway In MARC Breakdown | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Investigation Underway In MARC Breakdown

Play associated audio

By Rebecca Sheir

An investigation is underway into why a Baltimore-bound MARC train broke down in last night's sweltering heat.

The Maryland Transit Administration says the probe will determine why, minutes after leaving D.C.'s Union Station, the engine failed and the brakes jammed, stranding passengers for more than two hours without air conditioning.

To understand how hot it got on MARC 538, passenger Anthony Washington says to imagine...a sauna.

"There was steam in our car, like on the windows," he says." Everybody was glistening. That's how hot it was."

Washington, the volunteer coordinator at WAMU 88.5, says the riders in his car seemed healthy - if frustrated. But fire-and-rescue officials say several passengers suffered heat-related illness; at least three were taken to the hospital.

MTA spokesman Terry Owens says the agency is teaming with Amtrak and the Federal Railroad Administration to figure out what happened, and why.

"Power could have been an issue, weather could have been an issue. We don't want to speculate," he says. "We want to come up with some answers that will allow us to better handle the situation should it present itself again."

If it does, Washington says he'll start commuting to and from northern Baltimore in the comfort of his air-conditioned car.

NPR

Wounded Bull-Runner: 'If You Run Long Enough, You Get Gored'

Bill Hillmann, a writer from Chicago, contributed to the book Fiesta: How to Survive the Bulls of Pamplona. He was gored at this year's running of the bulls in that city, but says he plans to return.
NPR

What If The World Cup Were Awarded For Saving Trees And Drinking Soda?

We thought you'd get a kick out of seeing how the four teams in the final World Cup matches stack up in global health and development.
NPR

What Could $100 Million Buy You — Besides Campaign Ads In Kentucky?

Spending on the Kentucky Senate race might reach $100 million. So what else could that get you in the Bluegrass State? NPR's Tamara Keith finds out when she calls up some local business owners.
NPR

Looking For Free Sperm, Women May Turn To Online Forums

Bypassing commercial sperm banks, thousands are logging on to websites where women can connect with men at no cost. Anecdotes abound, but the scope of the unregulated activity is unclear.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.