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Annapolis Is The Finish Line For Race Across America

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Eduardo Llach, one of the racers who biked across America, arrives in Annapolis.
Cathy Carter
Eduardo Llach, one of the racers who biked across America, arrives in Annapolis.

By Cathy Carter

It's 3,000 miles from Oceanside, California to Annapolis, Maryland. Cyclists in The Race Across America are traveling that distance on bike.

It took six days, 15 hours and 29 minutes for Team Building Futures Now from California to reach the City Dock in Annapolis. Eduardo Llach is the captain of the four-man crew. He says cycling at night was the trickiest part of the race.

"I think that at one o'clock, at least my body, really wanted to go to sleep and it just did not want to be pedaling hard up the hills," the cyclist says. "And so it really became a hard time just staying straight and keeping the bike on the road."

Unlike the Tour De France, The Race Across America is not a stage race. Once the clock starts on the west coast it doesn't stop until the race is over. Teams are expected to reach Annapolis throughout the weekend.

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