Fans Pack D.C. Bars For Second U.S. World Cup Match | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Fans Pack D.C. Bars For Second U.S. World Cup Match

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By Jonathan Wilson

The Lucky Bar on Connecticut Avenue has been a gathering place for D.C. soccer fans for more than a decade. Earlier today a capacity crowd of well over 200 people squeezed in to watch.

Two unanswered goals by the underdog Slovenian squad left most U.S. fans a bit deflated. But in the second half the U.S. got its groove back, scoring two stunning goals to tie, and even scoring the go-ahead third goal before having it disallowed because of a controversial foul call.

Philip Berrill, born in the UK, but now an American citizen, says though the U.S. deserved the win, it'll be a while before he actually feels bad for U.S. soccer fans.

"They've got to suffer for years before they win anything; this is my 13th World Cup, and we have suffered," he says.

The Lucky Bar's owner, Paul Lusty, says he'll be rooting for the U.S. and England to advance--for business reasons. He says U.S. and English fans are the best beer drinkers.

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