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Obama Lays Out Plan For The Gulf

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By Jessica Stone

Dozens of seafood dealers in Virginia are losing business because of the oil leak in the Gulf of Mexico. Last night, President Obama laid out his plan for the way forward for all those affected.

BP has agreed to set aside $20 billion for legitimate claims, but the ripple effects are already being felt as far north as Virginia, where volume is down for more than two dozen seafood dealers in the state, who shell oysters and process crabs from the Gulf.

Republican Congressman Robert Wittman listened to the President's speech last night on his car radio. He says he wondered, will they too be eligible to file claims for compensation with BP?

"I want to make sure that it's done in the most timely and effective manner possible," he says.

The president also asked the public for new ideas to wean Americans off foreign oil. Virginia Republican Randy Forbes plans to re-propose his new Manhattan Project, which would create a contest to incentivize the private industry to meet energy efficiency goals.

"It doesn't put all of our eggs in one basket, and it doesn't require us to tax and regulate to get there," says Forbes.

The president has appointed former Mississippi Gov. Ray Mabus to develop a long-range recovery plan for the Gulf.

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