Thousands Of Inactive Voters Removed From D.C. Lists | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Thousands Of Inactive Voters Removed From D.C. Lists

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By Jonathan Wilson

D.C.'s Board of Elections is doing some spring cleaning. It has removed nearly 94,000 names from its list of eligible voters.

Board of Elections and Ethics Executive Director Rokey Suleman II says none of the voters on the list have cast a ballot in the city in at least eight years.

Suleman says though the names on the list are inactive, they do appear on voter rolls during elections.

He says this can give citizens the mistaken impression that people who have moved out of the city still have the ability to vote.

"None of these folks have voted since 2002, and what we're doing is coming in and cleaning things up to make things easier for us administratively," says Suleman.

He says voters do not usually notify the District when they move outside the city. Suleman says he's working with Maryland and Virginia to ensure more sharing of voter information before the next presidential election.

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