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More Problems May Be Uncovered At Arlington National Cemetery

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Arlington National Cemetery has set up a call center for families worried about loved ones' remains.
Cathy Carter
Arlington National Cemetery has set up a call center for families worried about loved ones' remains.

By Cathy Carter

It's Flag Day and the Army will be holding a ceremony for war dead at Arlington National Cemetery. Meanwhile, military families want officials at the historic site to answer questions about loved ones buried there.

Misplaced remains, unmarked gravesites, cremation urns being dumped. These are some of the findings into an Army investigation of Arlington National Cemetery. Officials found over 200 errors.

"But what they failed to really focus on is that there are 70 sections in Arlington National Cemetery. They looked at only three and they found 211 mistakes in three sections. What about the other sixty seven sections," says Gina Gray, a former Public Affairs Officer at Arlington.

She was one of the first to alert officials about mismanagement at the Cemetery. She says the investigation needs to continue because there are many more problems yet to be uncovered.

"The people who are buried in Arlington have earned better than what they have gotten. There should be a zero defect organization over there and there isn't, and I think it's shameful," she says.

Army officials have appointed a new director to oversee cemetery operations. A call center has been set up for families to address their concerns.


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