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"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Monday, June 14, 2010

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(June 12-August 8) SEE SOMETHING? SAY SOMETHING! Drawing inspiration from Metro's own loudspeaker alerts, Dutch painter Gery De Smet presents See something? Say something! at American University's Katzen Arts Center in Northwest DC, on view through August. Struck by the evocative phrase encouraging riders to prevent terrorism, De Smet took to his canvas, creating a series of witty works that focus on the idiosyncrasies of identity.

(June 14-July 25) PATSY AT TOBY'S Sixties songstress Patsy Cline's correspondence with a devoted fan is the basis of [Always…Patsy Cline(http://www.tobysdinnertheatre.com/tobysbaltimore_003.htm), playing tonight through late July at Toby's Dinner Theatre in Baltimore. The production chronicles Cline's fan-ship and the influential country singer's untimely death.

(June 14-) LOOKS GOOD ON PAPER Meanwhile, the National Museum of American History follows the paper trail during the exhibit Paper Engineering: Fold, Pull, Pop & Turn, opening today in downtown D.C. This display of innovative book designs turns the page on movable, pop-up and folding books from the 16th century to the present.

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