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Montgomery County Continues Green Business Push

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This ad will start popping up on Montgomery County RideOn busses encouraging businesses to go green.
Courtesy Montgomery County Chamber of Congress
This ad will start popping up on Montgomery County RideOn busses encouraging businesses to go green.

By Matt Bush

RideOn buses in Montgomery County, Maryland are already "painted" green. Now, they will start imploring businesses to "go" green.

The county runs a green business certification program. 20 firms have already been certified by revising their businesses practices, such as purchasing, record keeping, and power usage. County leaders would like to see that number increase, so advertisements will soon start covering the sides of RideOn buses, asking businesses to "go green."

Doing so makes good business sense says Gigi Godwin, the president of the county chamber of commerce, since many businesses in the county do work with either the federal government or government contractors.

"Large employers, and large companies, are greening their supply chains. They are changing how they do business. And a big part of that is going to be how they procure their goods and services," says Godwin.

The 20 businesses that have received the certification range in size from the Marriott hotel chain to PEPCO's customer service center to an orthodontist's office.

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