: News

Family Wants Answers About Young Man's Death

Play associated audio

By Patrick Madden

One year after a man was shot and killed by two U.S. Park Police officers in the Trinidad neighborhood of Northeast D.C., family members say they are still waiting for answers.

25-year-old Trey Joyner was killed last June by plainclothes U.S. Park Police officers investigating a tip about someone with a gun in the Trinidad neighborhood. They were part of the FBI led task force called "Operation Safe Streets." Authorities say Joyner was shot while police struggled to arrest him.

The shooting sparked an immediate outcry from family members and neighbors, who demanded to know why the park police officers were operating in Trinidad. There were other questions as well including some witnesses who say Joyner was unarmed and shot in the back.

One year later, family members, like Trey Joyner's mother, Brenda, say they have received no information or updates on the case.

"I don't understand how this system works. Every time someone gets injured or killed like this, they are not going to tell their family anything for a whole year, what kind of system have we got here?," asks Joyner.

Authorities have opened two investigations into the incident, one led by the Justice Department's Civil Rights Division. A spokesperson wouldn't comment other than to say the department is treating the matter very seriously.

The other probe was being led by U.S. Attorney's office in D.C., but in late May it recused itself and the case was transferred to U.S. Attorney's office in Philadelphia. Spokespersons for both offices declined to comment on the case.

NPR

Opulent And Apolitical: The Art Of The Met's Islamic Galleries

Navina Haidar, an Islamic art curator at the Met, says she isn't interested in ideology: "The only place where we allow ourselves any passion is in the artistic joy ... of something that's beautiful."
NPR

Here's The Buzz On America's Forgotten Native 'Tea' Plant

It's called yaupon. Native Americans once made a brew from its caffeinated leaves and traded them widely. With several companies now selling yaupon, it may be poised for a comeback.
WAMU 88.5

Fannie Lou Hamer and the Fight for Voting Rights

Kojo explores the life and legacy of Fannie Lou Hamer, a poor Mississippi sharecropper who became an outspoken voice in the civil rights movement and the fight for voting rights.

WAMU 88.5

Computer Guys and Gal

Chrysler recalls cars to boost their cybersecurity. Microsoft debuts its new Windows 10 operating system. And navigation tech could bring us robotic lawn mowers. The Computer Guys and Gal explain.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.