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Strasburg Could Help Nats Bottom Line

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By Patrick Madden

Washington Nationals pitcher Stephen Strasburg is being hailed as the team's savior. Fans are hoping the young phenom will lead the Nationals out of last place and already it's apparent Strasburg will help the team's bottom line.

The Nationals so far are cashing in at the box office. Attendance at last night's sold-out stadium was more than double the average draw for a National's game and according to a CNBC report, if these figures hold up for every Strasburg start, the team will bank an additional $5 million this year.

Then there is the merchandising.

The stadium was packed with fans in brand new Strasburg jerseys and at team stores, fans like Lorie Newton were rushing to grab as much Strasburg gear as possible.

"I got a Strasburg t-shirt that was just released for my husband, one for my son, a Strasburg collectible pen, and I am waiting for the baseball cards, his first pro cards," says Newton.

Other areas could see a bump in revenue as well. From parking fees and metro fares to concession sales, it looks like the young pitcher will be a major money maker for the team and, to a lesser extent, the city, which collects 10 percent of stadium revenue.

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