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Children With Disabilities Show Artistic Side

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Taylor Bernard's painting of the Chesapeake Bay is on display at Union Station.
Ginger Moored
Taylor Bernard's painting of the Chesapeake Bay is on display at Union Station.

By Ginger Moored

Disabilities like deafness and dyslexia haven't stopped some young people from creating great art. Winning works from a nationwide contest are currently on display at Union Station.

Taylor Bernard is 8 years old and sits in a wheelchair. She's also an artist. And with her muscles weakened from cerebral palsy, her mother Leigh says Taylor's had to learn to paint her own way.

"Her fine motor skills aren’t her strength, but when she does landscapes, doing watercolors and using more wide brushstrokes, she can make it look very realistic," she says.

Taylor's painting of the Chesapeake Bay made her the top artist from Virginia. At the exhibit's opening, winners from other states came up to her with their programs in hand.

"I autographed some of them," says Taylor, "it made me feel like a star."

Taylor plans to keep painting. Her watercolor, and the art of the other winners, will be on display through June 12th.

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