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"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Tuesday, June 8, 2010

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(June 8) HONORARY OSCAR The sixth annual D.C. Jazz Festival plays on with A Tribute to Oscar Peterson tonight at 8 p.m. at the Sixth and I Historic Synagogue in Northwest Washington. The "Maharaja of the keyboard" gets the tribute treatment from a duo of his disciples on the keys and fiddle and you can stay jazzy with more festivities through Sunday.

(June 8-13) WELCOME TO THE HOTEL CASSIOPEIA The University of Maryland's Department of Theatre presents an encore run of Hotel Cassiopeia through Sunday at the Round House Theatre in Silver Spring. The visually stunning production chronicles the life of renowned assemblage artist Joseph Cornell, who made masterful art out of found tchotchkes while caring for his disabled brother in a New York basement.

(June 9) CRANIUM CARNIVORES You can experience the neo-burlesque sci-fi extravaganza that is The Thing That Ate My Brain...Almost at the H Street Playhouse in Northeast Washington tomorrow night. Playwright Amy Lynn Budd's autobiographical show examines her relationship with her brain tumor, loved ones, and the world of medicine.

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