: News

Filed Under:

An Old Townhouse With A Mysterious History

Play associated audio

By Michael Pope

The cost of an Old Townhouse where George Washington once celebrated the 4th of July? $3.9 million. The value of that history? According to Realtor Donnan Wintermute, it's priceless.

"If, indeed, George Washington spent his last 4th of July here, that adds distinct historic value to the property," says Wintermute.

Any idea of what kind of number that might be?

"It would be difficult to affix a value to it," she responds

But what if it's not true? 20 years ago, City Archeologist Pam Cressey determined that this house was never a tavern and there was no evidence that George Washington partied here. But Cressey adds the oral tradition that the house is an old tavern known as Spring Gardens, has its own value.

"To say that it's traditionally known as Spring Gardens, that makes an interesting story," says Cressey. "How did it get that name and is it or isn't it? It keeps a mystery going."

Even if Washington never slept here, Cressey says the house has a fascinating history as a pleasure garden removed from the bustle of urban life in the early 19th century.

NPR

A Biography Of Your Cubicle: How This Became The Modern Workplace

The office has long been seen as a symbol of boredom: It's a killer of spirits, a destroyer of spontaneity. But reviewer Rosecrans Baldwin says a new book brings out its entertaining side.
NPR

California Farmers Finagle A Fig For All Seasons

Two growers are competing to harvest fresh figs earlier and earlier in hopes of transforming the industry for year-round production. But some fig lovers say they can hold out for summer fruit.
NPR

On The Ballot In Georgia This Year: JFK

JFK is running for a Georgia state Senate seat this year — John Flanders Kennedy, that is. He's a Republican, but his signs bear an uncanny similarity to the logo the former president once used.
NPR

Life Outside The Fast Lane: Startups Wary Of Web Traffic Plan

The Federal Communications Commission's proposal would let Web companies pay for faster access. But entrepreneurs, like Reddit's co-founder, are wondering how they would have fared with such rules.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.