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An Old Townhouse With A Mysterious History

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By Michael Pope

The cost of an Old Townhouse where George Washington once celebrated the 4th of July? $3.9 million. The value of that history? According to Realtor Donnan Wintermute, it's priceless.

"If, indeed, George Washington spent his last 4th of July here, that adds distinct historic value to the property," says Wintermute.

Any idea of what kind of number that might be?

"It would be difficult to affix a value to it," she responds

But what if it's not true? 20 years ago, City Archeologist Pam Cressey determined that this house was never a tavern and there was no evidence that George Washington partied here. But Cressey adds the oral tradition that the house is an old tavern known as Spring Gardens, has its own value.

"To say that it's traditionally known as Spring Gardens, that makes an interesting story," says Cressey. "How did it get that name and is it or isn't it? It keeps a mystery going."

Even if Washington never slept here, Cressey says the house has a fascinating history as a pleasure garden removed from the bustle of urban life in the early 19th century.

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