Metro Struggles To Maintain, But Some Want It To Grow | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Metro Struggles To Maintain, But Some Want It To Grow

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By David Schultz

Part of Metro's $700 million infrastructure plan, currently under consideration, is the purchase of a new series of rail cars to replace Metro's oldest cars, the ones that were involved in the fatal crash on the Red Line last year.

Peter Benjamin, chairman of Metro's Board, says this is going to be Metro's new M.O. moving forward.

"We are going to focus first in our priorities on 'state of good repair,' to make sure that what we've got, works right," says Benjamin.

But the number of people who ride Metro is expected to grow. Penny Everline, with Metro's Riders Advisory Council, says its infrastructure plan shouldn't just hold the line, it needs to grow as well.

"This version definitely maintains a state of good repair," says Everline, "But does not allow for much in the way of increased efficiency, quality or capacity that would mean so much to the riders."

Benjamin says Metro simply can't do this without more money flowing in from the federal government.

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