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D.C. Vote Protests Congressman Over Gun Bill Support

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By Patrick Madden

Advocates for D.C. voting rights are ramping up lobbying efforts on Capitol Hill. The group D.C. Vote is now taking on a bill to weaken city gun laws.

The group's surprise protest at the office of Mississippi Democrat Travis Childers certainly caught the congressman's staff off-guard. Childers is sponsoring a bill that would wipe away many of the city's gun laws. And one by one, supporters filed into Childers office yesterday to deliver letters and voice complaints.

It's been a frustrating year for D.C. Vote. The group supported an effort by D.C. Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton to pass a voting rights bill that contained an amendment to weaken District gun laws. That move backfired. The mayor and the city council protested, saying the price was too high. The bill was pulled by House leadership.

D.C Vote director Ilir Zherhka says moving forward, D.C. Vote will be much more aggressive in its lobbying efforts and steadfast in its opposition to watering down D.C.'s gun laws.

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