: News

Travel Up, But Lengths Of Vacations Down

Play associated audio
D.C.-area residents are expected to travel in higher numbers over Memorial Day weekend than last year.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/minidriver/
D.C.-area residents are expected to travel in higher numbers over Memorial Day weekend than last year.

By Matt Bush

More D.C.-area residents were expected to travel this holiday weekend than last year, a sign the economy is rebounding, according to AAA.

Rick Meehan is the mayor of Ocean City, Maryland, a town he says has only one industry: tourism. Much of the town's revenue comes from a room tax applied to hotels and condominiums. And while the number of visitors to the city has gone up over the past two years, Meehan says the economic downturn still changed how that happened.

"The condos made an adjustment," he says. "Three or four years ago, they started to get more active in the 'mini-week' program, where you could book a condo for three or four days as opposed to a week. I think that went along with the changes in the way people travel."

As for this year, Meehan says their room tax revenue is ahead of what they collected at this time last year.

NPR

How A Music Writer Learned Trust Is The Ultimate Backstage Pass

Lisa Robinson knows how to talk — and how to make others, especially musicians, want to talk. The veteran rock journalist speaks with NPR's Wade Goodwyn about her four decades behind the scenes.
NPR

Can Wal-Mart Really Make Organic Food Cheap For Everyone?

The giant retailer says it's adding a new line of organic food that's at least 25 percent cheaper. But a large-scale production and supply of organic food likely can't be achieved overnight.
NPR

Obama Adds Malaysia To His Asia Itinerary

Obama travels to Malaysia next week, where the government is under fire for the handling of a missing airliner. NPR's Wade Goodwyn talks to Josh Kurlantzick of the Council on Foreign Relations.
NPR

Watch For The Blind Lets You Feel Time Passing

A new watch allows the blind to feel time on their wrists. Designer Hyungsoo Kim tells NPR's Wade Goodwyn his watch allows users to tell time accurately without revealing their disabilities.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.