: News

Filed Under:

More Stress For Non- English Speaking Military Spouses During Deployments

Play associated audio
Josepha Matos (left) found her husband Oscar's (right) deployments very difficult because she doesn't speak English.
Kavitha Cardoza
Josepha Matos (left) found her husband Oscar's (right) deployments very difficult because she doesn't speak English.

By Kavitha Cardoza

This Memorial Day weekend we remember the sacrifices military families make, and for some, language barriers can make deployments even harder.

Oscar Matos from Haymarket, Virginia, has been deployed overseas four times. And his wife Josepha was left caring for their six children.

"Very, very hard because I don't drive," she says. Only me in Virginia, with the kids. We live in mountain, one hour for groceries. One child with asthma."

On the last deployment, he was injured.

"We got people shooting everywhere, we was running, I was jumping from one place to another, my body got to one place and my leg to another," he says. "I hear a big noise 'crack'! Big pain."

John Howard, with the non-profit Operation Homefront, says it's difficult for foreign-born spouses of service members, especially if they don't speak English.

"The void left by this service member being deployed creates an extra layer of stress," says Howard.

Operation Homefront helps military families with ongoing needs including baby items, computers and furniture.


French Bulldog At Heart Of New Children's Book 'Naughty Mabel'

Mabel is a naughty French bulldog at the center of a new children's book by Nathan Lane and Devlin Elliott. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Lane about his inspiration for the fictional dog.

How Do We Get To Love At 'First Bite'?

It's the season of food, and British food writer Bee Wilson has a book on how our food tastes are formed. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with her about her new book, "First Bite: How We Learn to Eat."

Snapshots 2016: Trump's Message Resonates With A Master Cabinet Maker

From time to time during this election season we'll be introducing you to ordinary people that our reporters meet out on the campaign trail. Today: a snapshot from a Donald Trump rally in New Hampshire.

What Is Li-Fi And When Will You Use It To Download Everything Faster?

Li-Fi is a lot like Wi-Fi, but it uses light to transmit data. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to the man who invented the faster alternative: Harald Haas.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.