Northern Virginia Imam Talks About Evolution Of Radical Muslim Cleric | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Northern Virginia Imam Talks About Evolution Of Radical Muslim Cleric

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A radical Muslim cleric, who counter-terrorism officials say is encouraging, if not participating in, terrorist attacks on U.S. soil and around the world, has ties to Northern Virginia.

The American-born Anwar Al-Awlaki has been linked with two 9-11 hijackers, the Fort Hood gunman, and the would-be Christmas Day bomber. His YouTube sermons may have inspired the Pakistani-American accused of trying to detonate a car bomb in Times Square. And the Obama Administration has placed him on its "capture or kill" list.

In 2001, Awlaki served as an imam at the Dar Al-Hijrah Islamic Center in Northern Virginia. The center's current Director of Community Outreach, Imam Johari Abdul Malik, recently talked with Maureen Fielder, about the evolution of a now infamous leader.

You can hear more of Maureen Fieldler's interview with Imam Johari Abdul Malik on Interfaith Voices, this Sunday afternoon at 3, on WAMU 88.5.

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