Budget Cuts May Still Not Be Over In Montgomery County | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Budget Cuts May Still Not Be Over In Montgomery County

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By Matt Bush

Council members in Montgomery County, Maryland have adopted a budget for next fiscal year full of cuts. Councilman Mike Knapp was one of two councilman to vote against the budget. He believes there weren't enough cuts in the plan. Knapp says there are still plenty of outstanding issues with the budget that could mean further spending reductions.

"We have potential litigation against the carbon tax piece that was put together. We have a potential referendum against the ambulance fee. We are still are waiting to see what our income tax receipts will look like, because if we see some movement there, we may have to come back with a savings plan already," says Knapp.

Police packed the council hearing room as the final vote on the budget was taken. Officers were protesting furlough days they will be forced to take, and the fact the school employees will not have to take them. School workers were the only unionized employees in the county that were not forced to take furloughs. The board of education argued if teachers had to take furloughs, it would have negatively affected student performance.

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