: News

Six-Year Transportation Plan Worse Than N. Va. Leaders Expected

Play associated audio
Virginia's Commonwealth Transportation Board is seeking public input on the Six-Year Improvement Plan before the proposal can be adopted in June.
Jonathan Wilson
Virginia's Commonwealth Transportation Board is seeking public input on the Six-Year Improvement Plan before the proposal can be adopted in June.

By Jonathan Wilson

When it comes to road projects, primary roads get the headlines. It makes sense, primary roads are the ones large and heavily trafficked enough to get numbered by the state, like Route 29.

But at Wednesday night's public hearing before Virginia's Commonwealth Transportation Board, it was a lack of funding for projects on smaller, secondary roads, that had Loudoun Supervisor Kelly Burk sounding the alarm.

"It is unconscionable that the fifth-fastest growing locality in the United States, Loudoun County, will receive $1,024 over the next six years toward its secondary road system," says Burk.

And Loudoun isn't the only county complaining.

Fairfax Board of Supervisors Chair Sharon Bulova says her county is only set to receive about $1,900 from the state for secondary road projects over the same time period.

"This is unsustainable," Bulova told the board, "and effectively brings the county's secondary road program to a halt."

The state's proposed six-year improvement plan (SYIP) calls for $7.7 billion in transportation spending over the next six years, a 10 percent decrease from the six-year plan adopted last summer.

NPR

Smithsonian Sets Phasers To Restore On Original Starship Enterprise

The Starship Enterprise — from the original Star Trek series — has gotten a restoration fit for a real life spacecraft. It goes on display this week at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum.
NPR

Click For Fewer Calories: Health Labels May Change Online Ordering Habits

Will it be a hamburger or hummus wrap for lunch? When customers saw indications of a meal's calorie content posted online, they put fewer calories in their cart, a study finds.
NPR

House Report On Benghazi Attack: Ample Warning, Weak Response

Republicans on the House special committee investigating the 2012 Benghazi, Libya, attacks release the results of their two-year-long investigation on Tuesday.
NPR

Click For Fewer Calories: Health Labels May Change Online Ordering Habits

Will it be a hamburger or hummus wrap for lunch? When customers saw indications of a meal's calorie content posted online, they put fewer calories in their cart, a study finds.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.