Group Says Highway Safety Laws Save Lives, But Only In Some States | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Group Says Highway Safety Laws Save Lives, But Only In Some States

Play associated audio

By David Schultz

The group Advocates for Highway Safety studied the effects of some of the laws states have passed in the previous two decades. They found that laws mandating seat belt use were some of the most effective, saving almost 25,000 lives since 1990.

But, not all states have seat belt laws. For example, in Virginia failure to wear a seat belt is a secondary offense, which means police officers can't ticket you for it unless they pull you over for something else.

Judie Stone, the president of Advocates for Highway Safety, says bills to make this a primary offense have failed in Richmond numerous times.

"So that's a very important one because if you have that law in place, the use rates are much higher. And that means that lives are saved," says Stone.

Nationwide, Advocates found highway safety laws, mandating everything from booster seats to motorcycle helmets, saved 85,000 lives over the past 20 years.

NPR

6 Novelists Withdraw From Event Honoring 'Charlie Hebdo' For Free Speech

Peter Carey and Rachel Kushner are among those who are withdrawing in protest from the PEN American Center's annual gala. Kushner says she is uncomfortable with Charlie Hebdo's "cultural intolerance."
NPR

Drop-In Chefs Help Seniors Stay In Their Own Homes

As people age, cooking can become difficult or even physically impossible. It's one reason people move to assisted living. One company offers a chef to cook healthy, affordable meals at home.
NPR

Congress May Be Forced To Intervene Again On Mammogram Recommendations

Six years ago, a task force caused a firestorm by saying women under 50 may not need routine mammograms. The controversy was so great, that Congress passed legislation overriding the recommendation.
NPR

Leave The Selfie Sticks At Home, Wimbledon Says

Taking the same stance as the Kentucky Derby and major music festivals, the All England Lawn Tennis Club reportedly cited the devices' "nuisance value."

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.